Aristotle

(384-322 BCE)
   Contrary to Plato, who concentrated on abstract concepts, his pupil Aristotle advocated knowledge through empirical investigation. Aristotle was from Stageira on the coast of Thrace. His father, court physician to King Amyntas III of Macedon, died when Aristotle was still a child. At 18, Aristotle was sent by his uncle and guardian to Athens to complete his education. There he studied under Plato for 20 years, after which he moved first to the court in Atarneus and later back to Macedonia, where he became the tutor of the young Alexander the Great. Returning to Athens once Alexander's education was completed, he opened his own school of peripatetic philosophy. He left Athens when the pro-Macedonian government there was overthrown and went to Chalcis, where he died in 322 BCE.
   In the Renaissance, Aristotle became the most widely read author from antiquity. He held his place as the fundamental authority in the major universities in Europe from the 12th to the end of the 17th century. In both Protestant and Catholic primary and secondary schools, Aristotelian philosophical and scientific principles provided the basis for their curriculum. Among Aristotle's extant treatises are the Physics,Metaphysics, Poetics, Rhetoric, Politics, and Nichomachean Ethics. Aristotle's interest in the observation of nature and its phenomena did much to advance realism in painting and sculpture in the 13th century, when crusaders recovered his texts from Byzantium and brought them back to the West.

Historical dictionary of Renaissance art. . 2008.

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  • Aristotle — • Philosopher, born at Stagira, a Grecian colony in the Thracian peninsula Chalcidice, 384 B.C.; died at Chalcis, in Euboea, 322 B.C Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Aristotle     Aristotle …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • ARISTOTLE° — (fourth century B.C.E.), Greek philosopher and founder of the peripatetic school. Aristotle achieved a unique rank in the estimation of Muslim and Jewish medieval philosophers, who often refer to him simply as the philosopher. Maimonides stated… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • Aristotle — [ar′is tät΄ l, er′is tät΄ l] 384 322 B.C.; Gr. philosopher; pupil of Plato: noted for works on logic, metaphysics, ethics, politics, etc …   English World dictionary

  • Aristotle — For other uses, see Aristotle (disambiguation). Ἀριστοτέλης, Aristotélēs Marble bust of Aristotle. Roman copy after a Gree …   Wikipedia

  • Aristotle — /ar euh stot l/, n. 384 322 B.C., Greek philosopher: pupil of Plato; tutor of Alexander the Great. * * * born 384, Stagira died 322 BC, Chalcis Greek philosopher and scientist whose thought determined the course of Western intellectual history… …   Universalium

  • Aristotle —    The importance of the newly rediscovered philosophical works of Plato in the literature and learning of the 15th and 16th centuries often causes students of the Renaissance to forget that the philosophy of Aristotle (384 322 B.C.), which had… …   Historical Dictionary of Renaissance

  • Aristotle — (384 bc–322 bc) Greek philosopher, logician, and scientist Aristotle, the son of Nicomachus, physician at the court of Mayntas II of Macedon, was born in Chalcis and moved to Athens in 367 bc, where he was a member of the academy until Plato s… …   Scientists

  • Aristotle — (Aristutalis, Aristu) (384–322 bce)    In the Islamic tradition, Greek philosophy is virtually synonymous with the name of Aristotle, who was traditionally known as both ‘the Philosopher’ and ‘the First Teacher’. Indeed, one of the most… …   Islamic philosophy dictionary

  • Aristotle — (384–322 BC) Along with Plato the most influential philosopher of the western tradition, Aristotle was born at Stagira in Macedonia, the son of Nicomachus, the court physician to the Macedonian king Amyntas II. At the age of 17 he entered Plato s …   Philosophy dictionary

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